NaturalHealthCritiques | Natural Health Facts, Studies, Remedies, and Product Reviews

Your Questions About Natural Remedies

Maria asks…

Who knows something about William Booth?

vti answers:

William Booth was born in Nottingham in 1829. At the age of 13 he was sent to work as an apprentice in a pawnbroker’s shop to help support his mother and sisters. He did not enjoy his job but it made him only too aware of the poverty in which people lived and how they suffered humiliation and degradation because of it. During his teenage years he became a Christian and spent much of his spare time trying to persuade other people to become Christians too.
When his apprenticeship was completed he moved to London, again to work in the pawnbroking trade. He joined up with the local Methodist Church and later decided to become a minister.

After his marriage to Catherine Mumford in 1855 he spent several years as a Methodist minister, travelling all around the country, preaching and sharing God’s word to all who would listen. Yet he felt that God wanted more from him, that he should be doing more to reach ordinary people. He returned to London with his family, having resigned his position as a Methodist minister.

One day in 1865 he found himself in the East End of London, preaching to crowds of people in the streets. Outside the Blind Beggar pub some missioners heard him speaking and were so impressed by his powerful preaching that they asked him to lead a series of meetings they were holding in a large tent.

The tent was situated on an old Quaker burial ground on Mile End waste in Whitechapel. The date for the first meeting was set for 2 July, 1865. To the poor and wretched of London’s East End, Booth brought the good news of Jesus Christ and his love for all men. Booth soon realised he had found his destiny. He formed his own movement, which he called ‘The Christian Mission’.

Slowly the mission began to grow but the work was hard and Booth would ‘stumble home night after night haggard with fatigue, often his clothes were torn and bloody bandages swathed his head where a stone had struck’, wrote his wife. Evening meetings were held in an old warehouse where urchins threw stones and fireworks through the window. Outposts were eventually established and in time attracted converts, yet the results remained discouraging-this was just another of the 500 charitable and religious groups trying to help in the East End. It was not until 1878 when The Christian Mission changed its name to The Salvation Army that things began to happen. The impetus changed. The idea of an Army fighting sin caught the imagination of the people and the Army began to grow rapidly. Booth’s fiery sermons and sharp imagery drove the message home and more and more people found themselves willing to leave their past behind and start a new life as a soldier in The Salvation Army.

Inevitably, the military spirit of the movement meant that The Salvation Army soon spread abroad. By the time Booth was ‘promoted to Glory’ in 1912 the Army was at work in 58 countries.

Paul asks…

Factfile on Charles Booth?

What do you know about charles booth? anything useful to do with the industrial revolution or poverty? Thank you for your help.

vti answers:

Charles Booth was born in Liverpool on the 30th of March 1840, the son of Charles Booth and Emily Fletcher. His father was a corn merchant, and both father and mother were committed Unitarians. Charles attended the Royal Institution School in Liverpool, undistinguished other than in arithmetic, until becoming apprenticed to Lamport and Holt’s shipping company at the age of sixteen.

Booth became a successful businessman. Booth’s success as a businessman can be attributed to many things: his good fortune in inheriting £20,000 capital; the support of his family and the culture of business in which he grew up; his energy, enthusiasm, courage and hard work; his assiduous gathering of facts and figures, and ability to interpret this data; and perhaps also his essential decency and integrity in his business dealings.

Booth also took an interest in politics. Booth campaigned unsuccessfully for the Liberal parliamentary candidate in the election of 1865. House to house canvassing in the slums of Toxteth, Liverpool was a shocking exposition of squalor and poverty, which must have contributed to his gradual abandonment of religious faith. But Booth developed a profound sense of obligation and responsibility towards the poor and to the improvement of social conditions.

The unprecedented scale of the problem of poverty in the rapidly growing Victorian cities was often sensationally reported in the contemporary press, and must have provoked a degree of fear amongst their readers. In order to combat the conjecture, prejudice and potential social unrest, Booth recognised the importance of a true description in facts and figures of the social landscape. From 1886 to 1903 he conducted an enquiry into the condition of workers in London, resulting in the publication of three editions of the survey, the final edition of Life and Labour of the People in London (London: Macmillan, 1902-1903) running to seventeen volumes. The work would absorb both Charles and Mary Booth and employ a team of social investigators including, at various times, Beatrice Webb, Arthur Baxter, Clara Collet, David Schloss, George Duckworth, Hubert Llewllyn Smith, Jesse Argyle, and Ernest Aves.

Betty asks…

who was william booth?

vti answers:

He was the founder of the Salvation Army:

William Booth was born in Nottingham in 1829. At the age of 13 he was sent to work as an apprentice in a pawnbroker’s shop to help support his mother and sisters. He did not enjoy his job but it made him only too aware of the poverty in which people lived and how they suffered humiliation and degradation because of it. During his teenage years he became a Christian and spent much of his spare time trying to persuade other people to become Christians too.

The young William preaching in the streets.

When his apprenticeship was completed he moved to London, again to work in the pawnbroking trade. He joined up with the local Methodist Church and later decided to become a minister.

After his marriage to Catherine Mumford in 1855 he spent several years as a Methodist minister, travelling all around the country, preaching and sharing God’s word to all who would listen. Yet he felt that God wanted more from him, that he should be doing more to reach ordinary people. He returned to London with his family, having resigned his position as a Methodist minister.

One day in 1865 he found himself in the East End of London, preaching to crowds of people in the streets. Outside the Blind Beggar pub some missioners heard him speaking and were so impressed by his powerful preaching that they asked him to lead a series of meetings they were holding in a large tent.

The tent was situated on an old Quaker burial ground on Mile End waste in Whitechapel. The date for the first meeting was set for 2 July, 1865. To the poor and wretched of London’s East End, Booth brought the good news of Jesus Christ and his love for all men. Booth soon realised he had found his destiny. He formed his own movement, which he called ‘The Christian Mission’.

Slowly the mission began to grow but the work was hard and Booth would ‘stumble home night after night haggard with fatigue, often his clothes were torn and bloody bandages swathed his head where a stone had struck’, wrote his wife. Evening meetings were held in an old warehouse where urchins threw stones and fireworks through the window. Outposts were eventually established and in time attracted converts, yet the results remained discouraging-this was just another of the 500 charitable and religious groups trying to help in the East End. It was not until 1878 when The Christian Mission changed its name to The Salvation Army that things began to happen. The impetus changed. The idea of an Army fighting sin caught the imagination of the people and the Army began to grow rapidly. Booth’s fiery sermons and sharp imagery drove the message home and more and more people found themselves willing to leave their past behind and start a new life as a soldier in The Salvation Army.

Inevitably, the military spirit of the movement meant that The Salvation Army soon spread abroad. By the time Booth was ‘promoted to Glory’ in 1912 the Army was at work in 58 countries.

There seems to be no evidence to support the statement made on some masonic websites that William Booth was a freemason.

As a footnote, my grandfather also used to tour with him, he used to put together the stage from where he preached from.

Sharon asks…

Is there an age thingie ?

Okay so i was just wondering if there was a free website where you can take like a child’s face and do an age transitioning like they did in this photo http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1366&bih=575&tbm=isch&tbnid=8SNlD0IL5poxvM:&imgrefurl=http://blogs.westword.com/latestword/2011/08/jonbenet_ramsey_at_21_what_would_she_have_looked_like_today.php&docid=mRb6XzD-Bz9ViM&imgurl=http://blogs.westword.com/latestword/jonbenet%252520ramsey%252520at%25252021.jpg&w=540&h=358&ei=UjQ1T4i7FMnv0gGPnpzdAg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=245&vpy=147&dur=586&hovh=183&hovw=276&tx=153&ty=85&sig=101111931791660074909&page=1&tbnh=106&tbnw=160&start=0&ndsp=27&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0 , because I think my cousin (shes 2) looks Like Pearl Mckay and i was just wondering if i could do an age transition to what she’d look like when she’s 6 years old and see if she looks like Pearl. I also just wannt do it cause how cool would that be ????
Best answer get best points ! Thanks !
-Samantha

vti answers:

Well, there is age booth which you can download on any android phone, it is a great app that anyone can use! There is also age kiosk which makes an older person look even older! SO using a two year old they would probably loook around 50! It is really funny and gets the whole famiy involved! Xx

Lisa asks…

name for a middle ages booth for fair?

my friend and i are doing a booth for a fair in our school. (auctually it’s a school tradition to do this) any way, we were wondering about a name for the booth. and obviosly it has to be appropite for school. and it has to be related to middle ages. the fair is some timeis june or july. and i know it’s a long time from now, but our class is getting ready now, so by next week ( i think) we need to know what we are nameing our boots.

thx so much!

vti answers:

Angel magix………..

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

No tags

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

<<

>>

Theme Design by devolux.nh2.me